Tag Archives: Canadian Notes and Queries

A Literary Journal Worthy to Mention | A Note about “Canadian Notes and Queries” on the Publication of their 100th Edition

CNQ

I have to confess to a new awaking in my mind recently. Since starting this blog, I have made a serious attempt at finding new items to read and review. Originally I had started blogging to kill off two of the most annoying questions I had received at dinner parties (“You have a media background – do you blog?” or “What are you reading right now?”) but as I continued to work on the site, I found that there were a group of people like me who were stuck behind complex bits of technology for their job who were looking for something to engross their psyche’s need for words when their day was over. So I have been keen on not only writing the blog but finding new sources of material for writing it. Hence my little mention of the literary journal Canadian Notes and Queries here.

While CNQ has been in my periphery for the last little while, it wasn’t until my recent visit to the annual Toronto Word on the Street festival where I purchased a subscription from the noted publisher Biblioasis. I was given a copy then and I check out a few back issues since. And I have to admit that there have a been a few items reviewed in that magazine (both new releases and old) that have gotten my attention. Plus there have been a few discussions of bookstores that I have been known to frequent.

Quote from CNQ’s website

The story so far:

Canadian Notes & Queries was first published in 1968 by William Morley as a four-page supplement to the Abacus, the newsletter of the Antiquarian Booksellers Association of Canada. Modelled on the British Notes & Queries, it was a journal, as Morley wrote, “of little discoveries encountered, often by serendipity, in the course of scholarly investigation,” and queries which often arise in the course of research which are beyond one’s “present resources to solve.” Morley passed on the magazine to Douglas (now George) Fetherling 22 years later, and Fetherling, sensing that the internet would soon take over the magazine’s function as an academic bulletin, reinvented it until it took on something more closely resembling its present format: a journal of literary, cultural and artistic history and criticism. Fetherling continued publishing the magazine with either “charming” or “calculated” irregularity—until 1997, when he passed it on to Tim and Elke Inkster of the Porcupine’s Quill. The Inksters published 18 more issues over the next nine years, before selling it to Biblioasis in 2006.

I was thrilled to see in my mail box last week that the first edition I received was CNQ’s 100 printed edition. Not only did it include insights from noted booksellers David Mason and Jason Dickson (although I have to question why my hometown of London, Ontario is referred to as sleepy in Dickson’s biography) but some insights into the workings of publishers McClelland & Stewart and House of Anansi. Also included are two pieces by noted author Mark Sampson (His views on archiving in the digital age are unique as is his book review –  which I just ordered based on that recommendation.)

In any case, this is just a quiet note to my fans of my blog who are looking for a bit more insight into what to read. Canadian Notes and Queries is worth checking out. When you are done with your workday of course.

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Link to CNQ’s website