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Empathy and Understanding Along Life’s Journey | Review of “After Drowning” by Valerie Mills-Milde (2016) Inanna Publications

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There are always events in our lives that seem to cause us to pause and sputter. We know we should move on or correct our lives because of those events but the shock still seems to cause us to dwell and ponder upon the effects of those events, even though we think we should move on. But eventually we do move on, even if we need to atone for our actions because of those events. And that is the theme that Valerie Mills-Milde documents in her novel After Drowning.

Page 5

On the day Ben Vasco drowns, the lake is graduating shades of greys, browns, iridescent greens. No white caps. the sky is a definite blue, with slow, cheerful clouds pinned above the beach as if to a child’s felt board. A summer sky over a brooding lake, a coarse, sandy beach curled around the rim of the town, beginning at the painted oil tower and ending where the high, wind-eroded bluffs rise abruptly from the lake’s edge.

Pen watches Maddie scamper from the nearby gully, a plastic pink watering can clutched in her hand. She has on a purple two-piece bathing suit and her belly protrudes, round and tanned. She is small for a four-year-old, and still delicious, thinks Pen. A piece of fruit. Maddie has collected an odd assortment of beach objects: a tick, a seagull feather, five stones varying in size and colour, a worn piece of green glass. She has laid them out in a pattern, with the stones making a circle in the centre, and now she waters the strange collection as though watering a row of pansies, for the moment preferring this to wading.

Pen has chosen a thinly populated spot on the beach, close to where the grasses start, and a distance from the waterline where many families plash in the shallows. The beach, she notes remains remarkably unchanged since she grew up in this small fishing town. She makes the calculation: fifteen years of living away.

There is something unique about a story written from somebody who’s career is not just focused on literary endeavours. Valerie Mills-Milde is listed in the biography of this book as clinical social worker. And this story is filled with personal unease that is common among us that  a reader cannot help but feel empathy with the characters. For me, the book was especially vivid seeing it was set in a port town near Lake Erie. I could easily relate to not only the settings but understand well the angst each of the characters feel as they witness the skillset they learned to earn a living become redundant. This was a complex read but definitely a read I could relate to on so many levels.

Pages 95-96

She stops reading. The article bears the hallmarks of a home editorial, just short of a rant. To her left, awkward and improbable and mounted on a pole, is a giant fiberglass model of a sturgeon. It is all spikes and teeth. A dinosaur. Port’s great hope. She looks at the lake, pinned down by a heavy layering of cloud. Port is difficult on days like these, the lake’s moods souring life in the town A septic place to live, and yet people persist.

Rod had persisted. Pen knows how bad off the fishing industry was back then, the lake poisoned by a steady seepage of phosphorous into its tributaries. Dead fish washed up on the beach. And the algae. Wherever the water was caught up in inlets, small coves, not worried by waves and currents, a green sludge formed on its surface. In 1969, before she was born, the waters of the Cuyahoga River, a faithful tributary of the lake, became so choked by petrochemicals it caught fire. The authorities had been embarrassed by the incident, pledging a massive clean-up, but the glory days of the commercial fishery were gone. There was nothing glamorous left in that life particularly here.

The memories of Rod that she carries are of a man who was not defeated or even worn, though she knows he must have been near exhaustion, getting himself out by five in the morning, working in all kinds of weather. When  Rod tucked her in at night she wrapped her arms around his neck, his skin chafing reassuringly against hers. Although she can’t recall everything, she still holds a bone deep certainty that he loved her.

And there are vivid descriptions in this book. Not just of scenes and other visual items but especially of feelings and emotions. This was a book that was easy to sink into a read and develop empathy for the situations that many of the characters were going through. And that is a rare quality in many works of fiction these days.

Page 127

They are comfortable people and completely gracious. Lea leads them into the house and Maddie immediately disappears into her room to change into a suit for a swim. “Hot, hot, hot…” she chants. The men slide out toward the back and Lea sets down two wine glasses on the stone counter, and opens a chilled bottle of Chablis. Pen knows that after she told him to leave, Jeff would have confided in Bill. If asked, Jeff wouldn’t have been able to provide and explanation for why they separated, and Pen feels certain that Lea and Bill believe she initiated it. Although they aren’t people to jump to conclusions about other people’s lives, she has wondered whether they have told Jeff to cut his losses.

Through the large glass doors, Pen can see Jeff and Bill standing over the barbecue, Jeff with a look of intense interest on his face, tossing out a comment to Bill who is nodding his head in agreement. Jeff has opened up two beers for them, taken from the fridge in the garden shed. Bill looks mellow, vaguely patrician, which Jeff is muscled and eager.

Valerie Mills-Milde has written and detailed and honest look at modern life and it’s cause/effect cycles with her novel After Drowning. It is reflective and thought-provoking and certainly a read worth pondering over. In any case a great piece of literature.

*****

Link to Inanna Publications’ website for After Drowning

Link to the Writers Union of Canada bio page for Valerie Mills Milde

Link to Inanna Publications website for Valerie Mills-Milde’s latest book The Land’s Long Reach

” I can’t talk to everyone I want to about writing in person, but this way young people and adults who want to write can watch videos or do writing exercises whenever they want to.” | Q&A with author Alice Kuipers on her new chapter book “Polly Diamond and the Magic Book.”

Polly

I think we all fondly remember that experience when we were first introduced to the joys of reading. Somebody carefully took us aside and showed us the magic of those little lines. And that is what talented writer Alice Kuipers is doing with the first of her chapter books about Polly Diamond – trying to encourage younger readers to want to read and write more. It is a real privilege to be part of Kuipers’ blog tour of “Polly Diamond and the Magic Book” and have her answer a few questions for me.

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1) First off, could you give a bit of an outline of “Polly Diamond and the Magic Book?”

Polly Diamond receives a book. Everything she writes in it comes true. Polly is lively and creative and she wishes for, well, everything! She turns her house into a palace and her sister into a banana. With beautiful illustrations by Diana Toledano, Polly’s adventure is to figure out how to get exactly what she wants!

2) Polly seems to be a very unique character. How did you come up with her? Was she inspired by a real-life person?

Polly made herself know to me in that strange way that characters have of appearing in the heads of writers. Then as I was re-drafting an early version of the book, I met a girl at my children’s school. The girl seemed to be so much like Polly that I interviewed her to get to know what it was like to be eight-years-old and full of dreams and hopes. The real life girl and Polly have similarities, but they also diverged as the book kept being rewritten. Polly got louder and clearer the more I worked on the book!
Polly Diamond Illlustration by Diana Toledano 2_preview
Illustration from “Polly Diamond and the Magic Book” done by Diana Toledano

 

3) Is there anything you are hoping this book will accomplish? If yes, what exactly is that?

I would love for the book to inspire a young writer. I have made a free online course for kids who want to write, which any of them can find here: https://writingblueprints.com/ p/writing-course-ages-6-10/ –hopefully this course gets young writers inspired to create their own stories. One of my favourite things about being a writer is seeing the work that kids create.

4) You live in Saskatoon while the illustrator  – Diana Toledano – is listed as living in San Francisco. How did the two of you work together on this book. (Travel to meet? Internet?)

This answer may surprise you, but Diana and I have never met. Not even that, we’ve never even spoken! In my experience, the way that illustrated books work when published with a traditional publisher is that the book designer and the editor co-ordinate the images and the text and, certainly for me, the illustrator and the author communicate through the publishing house, rather than through each other. It’s been an amazing process to see Diana’s illustrations come to life, and it has been surprising, fun and thrilling to see her vision for my words.
Polly Diamond Illustration by Diana Toledano 1_preview
Illustration from “Polly Diamond and the Magic Book” done by Diana Toledano

5) Are you planning a book tour with this book? If yes, are there dates/events you are looking forward to attend?

I’m traveling with TD Bookweek though Vancouver Island from May 5th-12th. I love going to schools and spending time with young readers. They make me laugh, make me think, make me want to write–it’s a real honour to be allowed to talk about my writing life with my children. Traveling though Vancouver Island will be a highlight for me as a writer!

6) So you seem to be active online with both social media and your writing courses through your website. Are you hoping to engage young fans through those tools with the creation of this book?

I’m hoping that I can spend a bit more time on my own writing by sharing my ideas online like this. I love to talk about writing and I have lots to say, but I also want there to be a resource on my website for people who want to explore some of my thoughts in their own time. I can’t talk to everyone I want to about writing in person, but this way young people and adults who want to write can watch videos or do writing exercises whenever they want to. Hopefully the courses are engaging and super fun. I have about 800 students taking my Chapter Book Blueprint and my Middle Grade YA Blueprint courses, so the online reach is huge and I think people like being able to write at their own pace.

7) Will there be more adventures for Polly in the future? If yes, when can we expect another book with Polly Diamond in it?

The second Polly Diamond book is already written and illustrated. It is due to come out a year from now–so, while I’ve been sharing this first book with the world, I’ve been copy-editing this second book. I love writing about Polly–she makes me laugh so much! And I love seeing Diana’s illustrations burst the story into life.

8) There seems to be a lot of thought and creativity in this book. How long did it take to bring this book from first notion to publication? Were there any serious roadblocks or hardships you encountered during that process in bringing this book forward?

So, the second Polly Diamond book took a year to write. But the first book took seven years. I wrote the first draft of that first book when I was pregnant with my daughter, who is now nearly seven. I had to redraft that first book many times, think, learn, redraft again. The earlier book was nearly published with another publisher, but in the end that didn’t work out. When Chronicle Press offered to publish, they wanted some rewrites, and so I was back to the desk. It’s always hard to face edits, well, it is for me. But they always push me to make the book stronger. And now the world of Polly and her magic book is established, it’s much easier to write about her, which is why the second book was written so much more quickly.
My daughter read Polly Diamond and the Magic Book to herself. It is the first ever chapter book she has read to herself, so the very long writing process worked out beautifully!

9) In our last Q&A you mentioned a few novels you were working on. Are any coming to be published soon? Are you working on anything new right now? If yes, are there details you care to share?

I have a non-fiction book coming out with Kids Can Press in a year. Currently it is called Always Smile and it is based on the life of Toronto teenager, Carley Allison. There is a film about her on Netflix called Kiss and Cry. It was an honour to interview her family, boyfriend and friends to make this book happen. I’m also working on two YA novels, and another book of non-fiction for teenagers about anxiety disorder, travel and writing. Of course. I’m always writing about writing!

 

*****

Link to Chronicle Books’ website for Polly Diamond and the Magic Book

Link to Alice Kuipers’ website

Link to the free online writing course for children 6-10

 

A Quiet Melancholia to a Profound Pastime. |Review of “Packing My Library: An Elegy and Ten Digressions by Alberto Manguel (2018) Yale University Press

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A few weeks ago, I witnessed a young twentysomething stand in front of a large shelf of books and comment how she wanted to be photographed on the floor in front of the books wearing a huge, bulky sweater. Her friend, another twentysomething, did not chide her in any way but agreed to photograph her.  They both carefully looked at the spines of the books, debated which ones to place around her on the floor, and then took the photo. They then  both looked at me at one point if they were committing a transgression in our digital age but I merely smiled at their actions. Of course, they are not alone in their desire of reading and reflection in this digital age. But the desire and the action of reading seems melancholy and antisocial in our busy reality. And that is the same feeling I felt as I read Alberto Manguel’s Packing My Library: An Elegy and Ten Digressions.

Page 13 First Digression

All our plurals are ultimately singular. What is it then that drives us from the fortress of our self to seek the company and conversation of other beings who mirror us endlessly in the strange world in which we live? The Platonic myth about the original humans having a double nature that was later divided in two by the gods explains up to a point our search: we are wistfully looking for our lost half. And yet, handshakes and embraces, academic debates and contact sports are never enough to break through our conviction of individuality. Our bodies are burkas shielding us from the rest of humankind, and there is no need for Simeon Stylites to climb to the top of a column in the desert to feel himself isolated from his fellows. We are condemned to singularity.

Every new technology, however, offers another hope of reunion. Cave murals gathered our ancestors around them to discuss collective memories of mammoth hunts; clay tablets and papyrus rolls allowed them to converse with the distant and the dead. Johannes Gutenberg created the illusion that we are not unique and that every copy of the Quixote is the same as every other (a trick which has never quite convinced most of its readers). Huddled together in front of our television sets, we witnessed Neil Armstrong’s first steps on the moon, and not content with being part that countless contemplative crowd, we dreamt up new devices that collect imaginary friends to whom we confide our most dangerous secrets and for whom we post our most intimate portraits. At no moment of the day or night are we inaccessible: we have made ourselves available to others in our sleep, at mealtimes, during travel, on the toilet, while making love. We have reinvented the all-seeing eye of God. The silent friendship of the moon is no longer ours, as it was Virgil’s, and we have dismissed the sessions of sweet silent thought which Shakespeare enjoyed.

Alberto Manguel has been one of the few non-fiction writers these days that I insist on reading. He captures a love of not only the craft of reading but the solitude that readers require for their habit in a way that encourages those of us who still race home from a long day to read a volume and ponder it’s meaning. His book A History of Reading is a cornerstone in my personal library, and I have given many copies of that book to friends as a must-read and a testament that quiet reason exists in the world. He has written many other enlightening and heart-warming volumes since that book but it was his volume The Library at Night that made me seriously begin to organize my bookshelves.  I shared Manguel love of organizing books in my own fashion as he did for his library in Loire, France. And I lamented lost books as he did as well. (I sadly left a copy of The Library at Night on a table at an ex-girlfriend’s, in hope that she would rekindle her love of books and me but I fear that either she or one of her following loves may have used it’s pages for rolling papers for smoking dope.) But now we come to this book where Manguel must pack up and leave his library in order to take on a new career.

Page 31 Packing My Library

There can be no resignation for me in the act of packing a library. Climbing up and down the ladder to reach the books to be boxed, removing knick-knacks and pictures that stand like votive figures before them, taking each volume off the shelf, tucking it away in tis paper shroud are melancholy, reflective gestures that have something of a long good-bye. The dismantled rows about to disappear, condemned to exist (if they still exist) in the untrustworthy domain of my memory, become phantom clues to a private conundrum. Unpacking the books, I was not much concerned with making sense of the memories or putting them into a coherent order. But packing them, I felt that I had to figure out, as in one of my detective stories, who was responsible for this dismembered corpse, what exactly brought on its death. In Kafka’s The Trail, after Josef K. is placed under arrest for a never-specified crime, his landlady tells him that his ordeal seems to her “like something scholarly which I don’t understand, but which one doesn’t have to understand either.” “Etwas Gelehrtes,” Kafka writes: something scholarly. This was what the inscrutable mechanics behind the loss of my library seemed to me.

Manguel has a gift for documenting something more than books and reading with his writing. He has captured something of the zeitgeist. I know I am not alone in my life surrounded by technology and egoists that I want to come home and ponder one of the many volumes that are on my shelves. Not only do they provide me with quiet enlightenment but act as insulation from busy, intrusive world. Any time I must pack up my shelves, I feel the same melancholia he does, until the items are unpacked and displayed again.

Page 50

The books in my library promised me comfort, and also the possibility of enlightening conversations. They grant me, every time I took one in my hands, the memory of friendships that required no introductions, no conventional politeness, no pretense or concealed emotion. I knew, in that familiar space between the covers, that one evening I’d pull down a volume of Dr. Johnson or Voltaire I had never opened, and I would discover a line that had been waiting for me for centuries.  I was certain, without having to retrace my way through it, that Chesterton’s The Man Who Was Thursday or a volume of Cesare Pavese’s poems would be exactly what I required to put into words what I was feeling on any given morning. Books have always spoken for me, and have taught me many things long before these things cam materially into my life, and the physical volumes have been for me something very much like breathing creatures that share my bed and board. This intimacy, this trust, began early on among readers.

Alberto Manguel has given us readers something unique and quietly profound in his book, Packing My Library: An Elegy and Ten Digressions. While it is somewhat melancholy at times, many of us do not feel alone now with literary wants and desires after reading this book. As I am certain my young friend will too when she wears her bulky sweater and reads this well-crafted volume.

*****

Link to Alberto Manguel’s website

Link to Yale University Press’ website for Packing My Library: An Elegy and Ten Digressions

 

 

“The Dark Divide is a bittersweet love story coming back to a more familiar place, allowing the reader to fall in love with the true beauty of Waterton” | Q&A with author D. K. Stone

There are many good suspense novels available and a good-many of them offer sequels to their original story lines. But none seem to offer the unique level of dedication that D. K. Stone offers to her books set in Waterton Park, Alberta. Her first novel ,  Edge of Wild (Link to my review), was gripping enough but now Stone is release the second novel in that series – The Dark Divide (Link to my review). Stone answered a few questions for me about not only her new book but how the level of interest her fans show to her, help her in her writing.

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1) First off, could you give a bit of an overview of “The Dark Divide”?

The Dark Divide is the second of a three part series that takes place in the small Rocky Mountain town of Waterton Park, Alberta, and it directly follows the dramatic events of book 1. In The Dark Divide, Rich Evan is on trial for the arson which destroyed the Whitewater hotel he once managed. There is one niggling doubt, however, a single fingerprint—linked to a decades-old unsolved murder—which suggests someone else in town might have started the hotel fire. As police try to uncover who the real criminal is, the danger that this “other” person presents becomes abundantly clear. Louise, the keeper of the town’s secrets, is caught between wanting to help Rich and needing to protect her friends. And when a mysterious stranger shows up, ready to expose these secrets, chaos is unleashed.

2) This is the second book that you have set in the rugged area of the small town of Waterton. How has the reaction been to the first novel. Are there any memorial comments to the first book you care to share?

One of the notes I most regularly received after Edge of Wild was that readers wanted to know “more about Lou”. The Dark Divide is, at its heart, Louise Newman’s story. Her history and secrets shape the story’s plot and her decisions cause the main events to unfold. I was happy when readers were pulled back into her story. “Picking up right where Edge of Wild left off, we are once again pulled into the magic of Waterton…” and “Reading this book was like getting reacquainted with old friends.” But my all-time favorite comment (perhaps ever) is this one that captures everything I wanted to do: “If Edge of Wild was an exploration into the wilderness and unnerving and jagged sharpness of an outsider trying to fit in, The Dark Divide is a bittersweet love story coming back to a more familiar place, allowing the reader to fall in love with the true beauty of Waterton, and an understanding of what warmth can come from such a crisp and cool place.”

It’s reviews like THAT which keep writers writing!

3) You mentioned in your Q&A with me a few years ago that you were going to call this book “Hinterland?” Was there a reason for the change?

You’re right! It was called Hinterland until the very last round of edits with my editor, Dinah Forbes, who suggested that I change the title to create a more evocative feeling. I honestly had no idea WHAT to call it, so I enlisted the help of my readers online. Eventually I had a massive list of possible names. Though none of them were exactly The Dark Divide, a number of them had to do with borders and darkness, and with that nudge in the right direction, I was able to rename. Once I said The Dark Divide aloud, I knew it was ‘right’.

4) Are you planning a book tour with this book? If yes, are there dates you are looking forward to attending?

Given my location in Canada, I tend to do more online book tours, and this year is no different. I’ll be doing a two week online tour with my Street Team. I’ll be posting links to all sorts of content starting April 14th. As for scheduled appearances, I will be at the Stonehouse launch in Edmonton at the Boyle Street Community League April 14th at 7:00p.m., at CrossIron Mills Indigo on June 6th at 5:00p.m. and at San Diego Comic Con (yes – you heard that right!) from July 19th through 22nd. I will have more details on panels as the date nears.

WatertonPic-DanikaStone

5) Have you been working on this book steadily since 2016? Was it a difficult book to write?

A portion of this book actually started off as part of the original first draft of Edge of Wild, but the story was so large and unwieldy that my agent suggested I try to break it in two. I drafted out a plan for two books—found that it was STILL too long—so I added a third, and suddenly I had a trilogy. I picked up those “pieces” early in 2016 and was able to complete the editing process by the end of the year. It was actually significantly easier to write The Dark Divide because it felt like I already “knew” my characters, whereas in book 1, Edge of Wild, I was still trying to get their voices right.

After months of writing and revising, I finally had something I felt comfortable sending to Stonehouse. I was terrified, but quickly heard back from then. They signed The Dark Divide in 2017 and the final polishing began. For those of your readers who are worrying that they take “too long” when writing, keep in mind that the first part of this book was written in 2012. That is quite a gestation from idea to bookstore!

6) How did you like working with Stonehouse Publishing for this book? 

Stonehouse Publishing is a young independent publishing house, with plenty of hands-on connection to its authors. You never feel like a “cog” in a machine when dealing with them, and I received outstanding support for my writing. They knew going in that I was writing a trilogy and they were supportive of that, without pressuring me to a deadline. (I really appreciated that, as I had other YA books on my plate at the same time.) Seeing The Dark Divide in print, I know that I made the right decision to connect with Stonehouse. From editors to designers to promotions staff, they are an incredible group!

7) You mentioned in a previous Q&A that you eagerly interact with readers via the internet and on social-media platforms like Facebook and Twitter. Was that experience true with “The Edge of Wild” and are you eager to interact with fans to discuss “The Dark Divide” in that manner?

Absolutely! One of my favorite things to do is to connect with my readers. A friend of mine beta-read a (new) story of mine the other day and live-tweeted her reactions. I laughed so hard I was crying! That kind of thing just doesn’t happen if you never chat. So, yes! If you’re reading The Dark Divide, I’d love to hear who you think the murderer is. I warn you though… even my editor didn’t see the twist coming, so it might be trickier than you think! (I also won’t tell you if you’re right. Ha ha!)

8) Are you working on anything new right now? If yes, are there details you care to share?

Right now I’m working on a couple young adult novels, one that is a contemporary YA, the other that is scifi YA. I’m also working on the as-yet-untitled book 3 of the Waterton series. On that note, if you have a title suggestion, I’d love to hear it!

Thank you so much for interviewing me, Steven. It was great to chat again!

My pleasure. Good Luck with the launch!

*******

 

Book trailer for The Dark Divide: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MCZBNt1LlZY&feature=youtu.be

Danika Stone, Author Bio:

Danika Stone is an author, artist, and educator who discovered a passion for writing fiction while in the throes of her Masters thesis. A self-declared bibliophile, Danika now writes novels for both adults (The Dark Divide, Edge of Wild, The Intaglio Series and Ctrl Z) and teens (Internet Famous, All the Feels and Icarus). When not writing, Danika can be found hiking in the Rockies, planning grand adventures, and spending far too much time online. She lives with her husband, three sons, and a houseful of imaginary characters in a windy corner of Alberta, Canada.

Ms. Stone is represented by Morty Mint of Mint Literary Agency.

Twitter: https://twitter.com/Danika_Stone

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/danikastoneauthor/?ref=aymt_homepage_panel

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/danika_k_stone/

Link to the Stonehouse Publishing website for The Dark Divide

A Work of Writing That Feels More Like a Good Conversation | Review of “A Generous Latitude” by Lenea Grace (To be Published April 2018) ECW Press

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I received an Advance Reading Copy of this book from the publisher.

Most of us crave a published work at times that feels like we are having a conversation with a group of friends. When one thinks of those conversations, one often reflects on serious elements as well as goofy comments and moments of quiet pondering. There is something enlightening as well as uplifting to our psyches after those types of conversations. And that is what reading Lenea Grace’s A Generous Latitude feels like. Less like a collection of poetry but more like a good conversation with a good friend.

Grace’s observations here are vivid, at times delightful and sometimes insightful. It is rare to note something like the fact that Guy Lafleur played hockey without a helmet led to his decision to record a disco album. Or that one sharing a video of one’s daughter bowel movement would be lead to a strong social-media friendship. But those are the types of comments that Grace has set in a lyrical yet unique fashion here.

A Generous Latitude by Lenea Grace is a fun yet  enlightening read. It felt comfortable at times and certainly worthy a few moments to read and enjoy.

*****

Link to Lenea Grace’s website

Link to ECW Press’ website for A Generous Latitude

Getting Caught into Watching Television | Review of “Caught” by Lisa Moore (2013) House of Anansi

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There is something engaging when we read a book and then watch a movie or a television show based on that book. Many of us readers do enjoy comparing and contrasting the plot lines from the two medium. And as the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation prepares to air the latest production that comes from a work of fiction – Lisa Moore’s Caught – many of us readers are already familiar with the book and are keen to see it come to the screen.

Page 21 A Room with a View

Slaney walked up the wheelchair ramp that let to the side entrance of the bar. From there he had a view of rows of cabbages and fields of hay. The clouds tumbled backwards in folds and billows all the way to the horizon.

The door was held open a crack with a stone and it was very dark inside and stank of beer and cigarettes. Someone had been smoking weed. There was a yellow cone of light over the pool table at the far end of the room.

The bartender was a scrawny woman with long silver braids tied at the ends with read glass bobbles. Her skin was tanned dark and her eyes were pale blue. She ware bibbed overalls and had a pack of cigarettes rolled up in the cuff of her white T-shirt. Two pairs of eyeglasses hung from chains around her neck. She was emptying ashtrays form the night before.

If you’re here fro the dart tournament it was yesterday, she said.

Harold sent me, Slaney said. He said maybe there was a room I could crash.

Harold say anything about child support for his three youngsters by two different  mothers? The woman asked.

He never mentioned, Slaney said. She reached under the bar and shoved some things around on a shelf and came back up with a key on a wooden fob. She sent it sliding down the bar toward him.

There is something direct and bold in the story that Moore created in the story of David Slaney and his escape from prison in June 1978, but there is also something about the human condition that she has brought forward here. Yes, we get antics of a man on the run but at times we get the thoughts, fears, longings, hurt,  and other deep emotions that many of us endure in our day-to-day lives. It is going to be interesting to see if viewers of the TV show will empathize with Slaney and readers did with the book.

Page 109 Jennifer, Juniper

Before the first trip, they’d had their big goodbye on the sidewalk outside Jennifer’s Gower Street apartment, the Jamaican flag hanging in the upstairs window, sopping K-Mart flyers out the mailbox, her tears wet on his neck while she held him.

Jennifer had thought Alberta, not Columbia. Slaney had said he was going to Alberta for work and as soon as he landed a job he’d send for her and Crystal. He’d have a nice house set up for them he’d buy them everything they’d ever wanted, all the furniture and clothes and toys they could imagine. Jennifer wouldn’t have to worry about money anymore.

Slaney had bent down by the stroller and pulled out Crystal’s pacifier and kissed her and stuck it back in before she had a chance to scream for it. And Jennifer stood there on the sidewalk, one hand on the stroller, pulling it back and forth, waving with the other. She kept waving until the car had disappeared around the corner.

Moore’s descriptions in any of her works are vivid and direct and that is true of this book too. Any reader can visualize any scene or any emotion easily. And the story is bold yet unique. One can feel empathy for Slaney no matter what the situation that he finds himself in to be. In any case the book is a good read and the show should easily mirror the book’s great qualities as well.

Page 147 Skills

After four weeks and five days at the Mansonville cabin Slaney’s new passport was ready. He went to the office and picked it up, along with the driver’s licence and the birth certificate he’d mailed in, and then headed to the rain station and bought a tiecket.

The formality of the photography studio and the blast of the flashbulb had rendered an unfamiliar look in his passport photo. It was an odd angle. Something, perhaps the false name, made Slaney feel like he was not himself.

The large white umbrella in the studio had been set up to bounce light and there was the need to be unsmiling. There was a look of bafflement.

Bafflement is a precursor to wisdom, was that the picture made him think. The picture looked like someone who would have to wise up. They were embarking on the next adventure. They were going to be rich. Look out, world. The guy in the photograph was him and was not him.

The picture said, Look out.

Or it said: Bon voyage.

While it should be an interesting show, most book-fans will be eager to make comparisons to it and Lisa Moore’s book Caught. The book is bold and a unique read, which the show should be able to follow in it’s own right.

*****

Link to House of Anansi’s webpage for Caught

Link to the CBC’s website for the television series Caught

 

RIP William Whitehead | MT of “Words To Live By” by William Whitehead (2012) Cormorant Books

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I have been thinking recently that there is something missing in a lot of our cultural products these days. While there is passion and drive in a lot of what we read and view, there seems to be a level of dedication to craft something for people to ponder and reflect over. This thought really became apparent to me when I learned of the passing of William Whitehead. “Bill” had been a small fixture to many of cultural items I remember from my youth – from the number of Nature of Things documentaries he wrote for to being loving partner to noted Canadian writer Timothy Findley. And his 2012 biography Words to Live By documented his dedication to his crafts and his loves.

Blurb – Back dustjacket

So – who is William Whitehead?

You probably know who Timothy Findley was – an internationally renowned writer know to friends and family by the initials of his full name: Timothy Irving Frederick Findley – Tiff. And if you ever attended one of his public appearances – a reading, a talk, a book signing – you may have noticed someone hovering nearby: someone tall, with a big smile, brown hair and eyes, carrying a bit too much weight and wearing a pen on a cord around his neck.

That was me.

While I had the pleasure of meeting Bill a few years ago, I had often seen him at Findley’s public events always giving a hand or a nudge when needed. But his dedication to life in general shone through in biography. Yes, he was “the guy” in Findley’s life but when I read his book, I realized how many documentaries and shows I had witnessed that Bill had been involved with. His work had influenced me, even when I never even noticed his name on the credits.

Words and Pictures  – Page 179

Another of the writer’s jobs was to devise a title, something I enjoyed. For a Nature of Things on the relationship of bodily fluids to the salt was from which we evolved, I suggested “Blood, Sea and Tears.” For a series on the uncertainties of youth employment” “Future Tense.” Once, when I was asked to write a script for a short film on the creation of soundtracks for dramatic films, I turned the job down, telling the producer that his documentary didn’t need a script. He was appalled. “But how will the audience be able to understand what’s going on?” I explained. Most of the film was split screen – half showing the dramatic action and half displaying the sound man creating the final soundtrack: coconut shells on sawdust-filled pads for hoof beats, smashing a cabbage onto a table for a blow to the head, etc. Then I said, “Look. Instead of hiring me to write a script, how would it be if I simply gave you a title and a subtitle, free of charge?” He was puzzled, until I told him what I had in mind: Track Stars: The Unseen Heroes of Movie Sound.

The unscripted film won a nice award – and certainly not because of the title alone. It was a good piece of work.

But, of course, Bill was involved with Findley and played an important role in his life and his work. In this book, Bill documented his relationship well, talking about the good times and the bad. More importantly he showed us that love – not matter who that person is – must be endured, and the reward for that endurance is a trust and companionship that comforts our existence through this life.

Words To Die For – Pages 214 – 215

As every successful writer knows, he is expected to do much more than just write the words. He must also help to sell them. this means weeks on the road, or on the water or in the air – living in hotels, rushing from interview to interview, often sacrificing lunch or – even worse -trying to answer an interviewer’s questions while also trying to take in some food.

The wors book tour for Tiff was in 1990, for Inside Memory. Nine solid weeks, with only one day free of travel or publicity work. Tiff had to go to an emergency ward in Halifax to deal with exhaustion and the flu. By the time we reached Vancouver, he was again close to collapse. At that emergency ward, the doctor – seeing me – suspected AIDS. While the blood test was being analyzed, he directed us to stand by in the waiting room. When he appeared, he looked grimly at Tiff – and suggested that it might be a good idea if I came along as well. This immediately signalled to us that what we were about to hear was dire.

It wasn’t. the results of the test were negative. Tiff could see that I was ready to explode with accusations centring on “Then why the hell did your attitude imply the reverse!” And he hurried us out of the room.

I began to wonder, though – were Tiff’s beloved words slowly killing him?

Bill has had a rich life in which he created – directly or indirectly –  some wonderful items for many of us to enjoy and learn from. There is a dedication he gave to his existence that was both light-hearted yet engrossing that feels unique and somehow missing from others as we regard their biographies.

Words To Die For  – Page 247

Will there be sun for me tomorrow?

I hope so. I’ve had the most wonderful life. Glorious people, fabulous place and more love and laughter than can be imagined. It’s hard to express how grateful I am for my life: grateful for everything, but not grateful to anything. I’ve never felt the need to imagine some all-powerful being who is responsible for creating everything I know and love. Many have been imagined. I view the various divinities that are worshipped in different ways by different groups, the various eternal paradises that are promised, as wishful thinking. I hope that all such worshipper will allow me to find my own way out of this life in much the same way I found my way into it: innocent of knowledge about how, where, when and why everything I know came into being.

I had shared the news of Bill’s passing on a few social-media fronts and there were many comments back of sadness and discussion threads about his life. But his autobiography is a testament of his life and his unique contributions to lives and loves around him. I encourage people to read William Whitehead’s Words To Live By and to consider and cherish his existence. As I cherish his book on my bookshelf.

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*****

Link to Cormorant Books webpage for Words To Live By

“One big inspiration (of the book) was a fantasy of the good life and how to find it, which involved having good friends you’d live close to and share life with as well as access to art and fewer cars and concerns” |Q&A with author Liz Harmer on her new book “The Amateurs”

 

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It is always a thrill to see a new work come available for us readers to enjoy. Liz Harmer has been in my social-media network for a while now and her novel “The Amateurs” is being published on April 24, 2018by Knopf Canada. Liz was kind enough to answer a few questions about her novel and provide some insights into her writing style.

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1) First off, could you give a bit of an outline of “The Amateurs?”

At the centre of The Amateurs is “port”, a product released by a tech company called PINA, which proves to be nearly irresistible. People buy it, use it, and soon the world depopulates. The novel focuses on two groups living after this kind of rapturing apocalypse—a few dozen people living in Hamilton-like former steeltown, and nearly a thousand holing up on the PINA campus in California—who are grieving everything and everyone they’ve lost, afraid of and desperately curious about the ports, and trying to figure out what’s next. The novel moves from the steeltown group to California and back.

 

2) How long did it take you to write the book? Was there anyone or anything that inspired you to write it?

 

One big inspiration was a fantasy of the good life and how to find it, which involved having good friends you’d live close to and share life with as well as access to art and fewer cars and concerns. I had a picture of an economy somehow happily collapsed by technology. This mutated, of course, and I ended up thinking a lot about hinge moments in life in which I might have, for example, completely screwed up my marriage—just the sort of fantasies one has around time travel and do-overs. I thought the idea that portals promising a good life might create one inadvertently was funny. My husband Adam was finishing his PhD in Philosophy around the writing of the novel, and we share an interest in the paradoxes of time travel (among other paradoxes), which was another spur.

 

From the first attempted pages, the book took around fifteen months to write, but I had been writing character sketches of Marie and Jason for much longer than that. Then the editing and revising took another year or two. It’s hard to find the boundaries around that kind of timeline.

 

3) “The Amateurs” has been listed as part of Knopf New Face of Fiction program. How did the novel get chosen for that program?

 

I don’t know how that happened—but I am so thrilled to be on that list and to be publishing with Knopf.

 

4) Who are your favourite writers? What are you reading right now?

 

I love Virginia Woolf and Jane Austen, and I’m also very enthusiastic about Zadie Smith, Rachel Cusk, Heather O’Neill, and Elena Ferrante. Ottessa Mosfegh’s stories and her novel Eileen were some recent favorites. I’m currently reading Ruth Franklin’s biography of Shirley Jackson—it’s excellent—and I’m just starting Doris Lessing’s The Golden Notebook.

 

5) Your website states you also write essays and short pieces of fiction. Do you find any differences between the two forms of writing? Is there one form you prefer over the other?

 

Yes, and I’ve also been recently trying to write poetry. Each form provides something different, though I have a lot of trouble knowing for myself what that difference is. My nonfiction tends to be memoir, and I like all my work to be exploratory and open-ended as I’m very uncomfortable with definitive statements, at least in my writing. I tend to prefer whatever I’ve been working on—right now, I prefer fiction and feel most comfortable within it—I like to create a voice and get to know a character.

 

6) Are you working on anything new right now? If yes, are there details you care to share?

 

Yes—many new things, actually. Partly because I am very busy with young kids and too many responsibilities, and partly because my personality likes novelty, I’m always working on lots of projects at once. I’m several drafts into one new novel (a realist novel about commitment to marriage and to religious belief) and part way into a first draft of another; I’m working on a bunch of short stories; and I’ve been working on and researching a long nonfiction project to do with mental illness in my family.

 

7) You seem to be active on social media platforms like Facebook and Twitter. How do you like using those sites? Are you planning to use those applications to connect with fans of your writing?

 

Definitely. I’m on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, and I’m trying to figure out how best to use them. I used to really love blogging, which I think led me to write more nonfiction, and I want to figure out how to enjoy social media that much.

 

8) Are you done any public readings of you work? If yes, is it something you enjoy to do? Are you planning a book tour with the release of “The Amateurs?”

 

I have done a few readings over the past few years, of stories and essays and parts of The Amateurs. I think it’s a skill I’m getting better at, especially with some practice I’ve had reading poetry aloud. I enjoy it and tend to like events—I like going to readings also. My tour will take me to Southern Ontario in May, to start with, with more events to follow.

 

9) Your biographies have you listed as having moved from Hamilton, Ontario to California. How do you like living there now? Do you get back to Canada much?

 

I do get back to Canada fairly frequently, both with and without my family. We moved because of my husband’s academic job, which we were extremely lucky to get, but I suffer from a lot of homesickness. I miss the changing seasons—even the grey skies of the endless Southern Ontario winters—and it was hard to leave friends and family behind, especially when our kids were so young. But we have made wonderful friends here, and pomegranate trees and blue skies can be nice. I was writing The Amateurs during the move—had finished the first part during my last summer in Hamilton and started the second part before we even had an internet connection here—and my mentor with the U of T, Charles Foran, joked with me that I was going through a kind of portal while I wrote my portal novel.

*****

Link to Liz Harmer’s website

Link to Penguin Random House Canada’s website for “The Amateurs”

Getting to Know Ava Lee before her Television Debut | Review of The Dragon Head of Hong Kong/The Water Rat of Wanchai (2014) Spiderline

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Readers of crime novels and thrillers are a special breed. They not only have the pleasure of reading their genre through books but also viewing the actions of their characters in television programs. And now that one of the most noted characters is in production to come to the small screen, I figured it was time to introduce myself to Ava Lee via Ian Hamilton’s The Dragon Head of Hong Kong and The Water Rat of Wanchai.

Page 6

“Mr. Lo, even if I can locate the money, how do you expect we’ll get our hands on it?”

His chin slumped onto his chest and he stared at his feet. “I don’t know, but I can’t just do nothing. I can’t leave things the way they are. The pressure at home from my wife and my brother-in-law is going to be unbearable. But I know that if I tell her you’re looking into it, it will buy me some time.

“I honestly don’t know enough about how things operate in Hong Kong and China to be of much help.”

“Please.”

Ava sighed. “Look, I’ll make some phone calls tonight to some people who do know how things work there. I can’t promise you any more than that.”

“So you aren’t saying no?”

“Or yes.”

“That’s good enough.”

How desperate is this man? She thought. “Okay, so we’ll leave it at that. I’ll contact you sometime tomorrow and let you know what I’ve decided to do.”

There is something fresh in the concept of the lead character of Ava Lee. Here we have a detective that doesn’t deal in bodies but chases down unpaid debts by deadbeat liars in exotic locations. ‘Follow the money,’ is the adage of many crime and police plots but here we have an accountant actually chasing money in a tough and rough manner. It is a concept we can all relate to while being whisked away to far-flung corners of the globe.

Pages 212-213

It was a quick ride to the city centre. Their route took them over the Tsing Ma Bridge, six lanes of traffic on the upper deck, rail lines beneath. The bridge always took Ava’s breath away. It was close to a kilometre and half long and soared two hundred metres above the water. The Ma Wan Channel, part of the South China Sea, glittered below in the early morning sun as sampans and fishing boats skirted the armanda of huge ocean freighters waiting to be escorted in Hong Kong’s massive container port.

They slowed when they reached the city proper, caught in the last of the morning rush hour. Hong Kong isn’t a city filled with private cars. Finding a place to park isn’t easy or cheap in a place where office and retail space in rented by the square inch, but there are red taxis everywhere, scurrying like beetles. Sonny drove carefully – too carefully for Ava, but he was a cautious man, maybe even deliberately cautious. It was as if he were restraining his true nature. She had seen this trai in him when he attended mettings with Uncle. He didn’t do that often, but when he did, he remained standing off to one side, his eyes flickering back and forth as he followed the flow of conversation. Ava realized that his body language changed along with the tone of the meeting. If Uncle was having his way, Sonny was placid. Any opposition to Uncle position caused him to tense, his eyes growing dark.

I couldn’t find any new information about the release date of the TV series but I was excited to read that Ian Hamilton has published a new book in the series – THE IMAM OF TAWI-TAWI  – this past week.  No doubt, as I beging to work my way throught the series of the earlier books, I will enjoying the combination of action, footwork and suspense that Ava Lee finds herself in.

Pages 370-371

“I think he’s about to leave,” she said.

Patrick called a number from his cellphone. “Wake up, boys,” he said.

“See the small guy in the apron?” he said to Ava. “He’s one of our leading drug dealers; does most of the imports. He’s also a friend of a friend. Until now it didn’t occur to me that he might be involved with Seto and Ng. After all this is over I’ll have to ask.”

The trio exited the restaurant and climbed back into the Land Rover. Ava held her breath.

They followed the car as it lumbered two blocks and parked at Eckie’s. Seto and the woman climbed down. Ava saw him say something to Ng, who was still in the Land Rover. The black Nissan was four spots farther along.

Patrick used his cellphone again. “Give them about ten minutes inside and then get Ng,” he said. He reached over and opened the glove compartment. Ava saw a semi-automatic in an shoulder holster and sevral pairs of handcuffs. “We need two sets, I imagine,” he said as he put on the holster.

“I want to tape their eyes and his mouth before we get them in this truck,” she said.

“Just his?”

“Someone has to tell us the entry codes for the gate, and I’m sure the house is protected as well.”

Certainly Ava Lee will transfer well into the small screen but until she does, many of us will continue to read her adventures written by Ian Hamilton. And combo set of The Dragon Head of Hong Kong/The Water Rat of Wanchai are great places to start.

*****

Link to Ian Hamilton’s website

Link to House of Anansi’s website for combo The Water Rat of Wanchai/The Dragon Head of Hong Kong edition

Link to Strada Films website

In Defense of Actually Reading Books in 2017 |Mention of Angie Abdou’s “In Case I Go” Arsenal Pulp Press

978-1-55152-703-1_incaseigo

This will be my final post for 2017. And there are a few things I want to accomplish with it.  Most importantly I want to reflect on one of my favourite books of 2017- In Case I Go by Angie Abdou. I also know that it has been a bit of time since I posted here and my followers have been wondering why, so here is a quick note. (I have been busy with earning money to purchase more reading material – so expect more posts in 2018.)

Now to In Case I Go. I was heartbroken to read and hear some of the slagging that this book has been receiving. Abdou documented not only for me but for many people I know a reality that is true in this book. The plot deals with a young white boy realizing that his descendants were far from perfect in their actions in dealing with minorities and that the present-day actions of his parents are far from ideal. Now, there has been a lot of empty talk of some of the details that Abdou used to move this plot forward. I admit that I don’t know some of the facts behind some of these discussions but they seem trivial and petty. Abdou has captured for me some of the angst that I remember as a child coming aware in a far from perfect world and that is for me the mark of a great piece of literature. And for many of my fellow readers who work long hours in dirty jobs, have far from perfect credit ratings and who’s feet stink because they been on them all day, this was a work that reflected some of the pain of their reality as well. And it was a pleasure to hear Angie read from this book a few months ago when the staff at a local library made an extra effort to bring her in a Friday night and let us book-lovers hear her words and thoughts.

There were many great works this past year that were worthy of unwinding and pondering over but this book was the one that caught my eye the most. Thanks to all the writers whom captured my attention this past year with their dedicated craft.

However In Case I Go by Angie Abdou is the one item on my bookshelf now that holds a special place for me. I wept when reading it because I found a reality that documents my life. Trust me this is the one book that should be read. (And I spend my days wading through tripe that should be trash but is revered. ) And I know that I am not alone in calling this a great piece of literature.

go

*****

Link to Angie Abdou’s website